Exploiting the untapped potential of the dermis to provide novel insight into the function of the skin microbiome

Grantee: Assistant Professor Christopher James Barnes, PhD, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen 

Amount: DKK 2,388,289

The skin microbiome has been thought to be highly individual, a kind of ‘microbial fingerprint’.

Yet scratching beneath the surface with DNA metabarcoding different skin compartments, we have found considerably less variation in the bacterial communities of the dermal compartment compared to the outer epidermal, challenging this dogma.

Here, we will extend upon these findings by performing a more comprehensive shotgun metagenomic approach, assessing whether compositional differences in the dermal and epidermal microbiomes effect their functioning.

The invasiveness of biopsies has been a major limitation in sampling of dermal microbiomes. Tape-stripping is a minimally invasive technique that penetrates through the epidermal compartment to the barrier with the dermis, and here we assess whether tape-stripping can substitute biopsies in accessing the potentially more informative, less environmentally variable skin microbiomes.

Finally, we will compare the dermal microbiomes of healthy controls to patients suffering atopic dermatitis (AD). Sufferers of AD have been repeatedly shown to have a perturbed epidermal microbiome, but they also have perturbed immune systems. Here we perform shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches to test for functional differences between the microbiomes of AD patients and healthy controls.

Studying the differences between healthy and diseased dermal microbiomes may ultimately fast-track identifying influential microbes associated with diseases, and their function within them.